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Students recieve scholarships at luncheon

Faculty, staff and students gathered for the sesquicentennial Emporia State Founder’s Day luncheon on Friday Feb.14 in Webb Hall. During the luncheon, Kendra Briggs, graduate music major, and Kristina Bramwell, sophomore elementary education major, were announced as the winners of the second annual 1863 Scholarship essay competition.

Students entering the competition wrote essays about how ESU has changed their lives. Gwen Larson, assistant director of media relations, said essays were submitted to Roe R. Cross distinguished professors for review on Monday, Feb. 5.

“There was a much tighter turnaround for submissions this year with school starting so late,” Larson said.

Larson said there were forty-seven entries this year. Mel Storm, professor of English said the snow days earlier this month helped free up time for the professorship to read the submitted essays.

Briggs won the first place prize, a $1,000 scholarship, with her essay “Igniting The Flame.” She said her essay explains how she “came to find her dream of starting a youth orchestra after coming to ESU and joining the Emporia Symphony Orchestra.”

Bramwell won the second place prize, an $863 scholarship with her essay titled “Through a Different Set of Eyes,” detailing her journey from earning her bachelor’s degree in social science at ESU to teaching students in the Virgin Islands. She returned to ESU to obtain a Bachelor’s degree in elementary education last year and is currently a Resident Assistant in Morse Hall.

Shonrock spoke about the future of ESU at the luncheon as the campus reflects on the last 150 years.

“As you know, in our last 50 years leading up to 2014, a lot of great things have happened at Emporia State University,” Shonrock said. “Our Great Plains study, Kansas Business Hall of Fame, The National Teacher’s Hall of Fame, SLIM (School of Library Information and Management), the nursing program and the School of Business were formed.”

Shonrock made comparisons between ESU’s 50th anniversary in 1913, 100th anniversary in 1963 and 150th anniversary last year, highlighting how pop culture, ESU and Kansas appeared then and now.

As ESU closes out its sesquicentennial year, Shonrock said the campus is thinking about what student body and academics will look like during ESU’s bicentennial anniversary, which is when the “150th” time capsule will be opened.

“I think they may put me in the capsule,” Shonrock said jokingly during the luncheon. “I’m looking forward to popping out of there in 50 years and saying ‘Surprise!’”

The time capsule was sealed before the luncheon last Friday at the Center for Student Involvement.

“I think the most important thing is that we filled the capsule with pictures of faculty, staff and students because it really is the faces of the institution that continue on,” Shonrock said. “If you’ve never had a chance to go through the yearbooks, go through them. You can see all the faces, smiles, enthusiasm, excitement and dreams of our Hornets.”

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