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Crocheting club creates relaxation time

Crocheting club creates  relaxation time

Alex Hammerschmidt

Tasha Messer, junior secondary education major, crochets the beginnings of a blue blanket Feb. 21 in the Memorial Union lobby. Messer is new to the club, but learned to crochet from her parents when she was younger.

At 6 p.m. every Monday in front of Webb Hall, a group of students can be found working away over needles, hooks and yarn in the Unwind Knit and Crochet Club. The low-pressure group consists of approximately 10-15 women and one man.

“It’s hard for me to sit down in my dorm room when I know I have a ton of other stuff I could be working on and actually work on a project I have,” said Michaela Riley, junior secondary English education major and club treasurer. “So it’s a nice little hour that I can set aside during the day to actually just sit and work on my project and not stress out over homework or anything.”

The club was created in the fall of 2012, but lost its Recognized Student Organization status in the spring of 2013 due to confusion over community service hours. Unwind Knit and Crochet seeks to provide a low-key space for students to unwind and work on their yarn projects.

Unwind recently reinstated their RSO status and has also knitted and crocheted items for several different charities. The club has made baby hats for the Shiloh Pregnancy Center, scarves and hats for the homeless shelter and ear warmers for the citizens of cold Matamoros, Mexico.

Unwind encourages students who are seasoned knitters and those just starting to crochet to intermingle and exchange ideas. Lyndsey Kopsa, senior interdisciplinary studies major, said there are many experienced people who want to share their knowledge with others.

“We don’t care if you’re a guy, girl or whatever,” Kopsa said. “It’s just if you want to learn, if you want to actually do it with someone, you’re welcome.”

Kopsa, who learned to crochet in 2002 through a teacher, taught another member, Melissa Hoyle, senior secondary biology major, how to crochet a month ago. They are both currently working on blankets. Kopsa is far along in her project, while Hoyle is just getting into hers.

“I tried to learn before but I didn’t stick with it so I forgot about it,” Hoyle said.

Hoyle also said she had been interested in crocheting for a while, and Unwind seemed to give her the time she wanted to learn without feeling pressured.

“It’s a good way to be social, even if you’re introverted,” Hoyle said.

For students unsure what Unwind has in store for them, Kopsa, Hoyle and Riley said there is no better way to know than to try.

“There’s no pressure to be good at it right away, and you work at your own speed,” Hoyle said. “I think it’s just a way to be creative. For some people, I think it’s just a way to get away from the stressfulness of classes and stuff like that, and then you can just learn something new.”

The Unwind Club also meets Wednesdays at 1 p.m. and every other Friday at 3 p.m. in the Memorial Union.

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